Jump to content
Devin

What Have You Done To Your Bull Lately?

Recommended Posts

UIM gaskets don't need to be replaced, if you aren't moving the UIM.

96-03 tec do not require UIM removal for plugs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have had the UIM off my '03 a few times and put it back and it works just fine. I wipe off the area and check the gasket. If it is not damaged no reason to replace it. I consider it best for plugs, wires, or coil as well as vac hoses and PCV valve and hose on DOHC. My gasket seems like new and I am careful to wipe the surface and put the gasket in place.

 

My '01 only been off once.

 

In both I use antiseize on the EGR valve bolts and gasket so it will come off easy next time.

 

My take is the gasket is robust and should not leak if done with some care.

Hard to vision the lower leaking air.

 

-chart-

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

UIM gaskets don't need to be replaced, if you aren't moving the UIM.

96-03 tec do not require UIM removal for plugs.

 

I disagree. I don't believe you can accurately and evenly torque the spark plugs by using several wobble extensions to install the rear set.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did you try removing the entire cowling.  That's how you do plugs on a Vulcan.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

PlugsBack3_zps48a83f06.jpg

 

If you are ready for plugs = 100K, then you are ready for PCV and hoses. Note in the pic upper right, that hose ready to break off.

I went to real pain to do the PCV before the plugs and then found the UIM really easy to get off and open up the vac hoses and plug wires and such. Once you have done it, it is just bolts and hoses, keep score to put it all back, and all the elect connectors. My suggestion is to do PCV and plugs at 100K with the UIM off.

-chart-

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another issue is also that the boots on the wires would need to be bent and forced on, there's not just a lack of hand space. I tried just doing wires on the back end without pulling the UIM and it was way too much of a pain.

 

Sure, you can 'save time', but make it easier on yourself. Especially since plugs are rarely changed, and you can do the UIM gaskets then.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I will be doing this job on my mom's 2003 Escape when I am home over Christmas.  I will try and remember to snag some pictures to compare the difference between the Taurus/Sable Duratec, and the Escape/Mariner. The engine is set considerably lower in the Escape.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just carry the fear of having something drop down into the intake, which is why I avoid removing it.

 

I also have small hands admittedly - and I've never torqued spark plugs like I probably should be doing on aluminum.

 

I've just had the habit of popping cowling off if the room isn't there when I need to do something.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Duratec intake gaskets are designed to be reused a few times so long as they are cleaned and inspected before putting them back in.

The first time I did plugs on the 00 when it still had the 00 engine I didn't remove anything to do the rears. Pulled the coil out, reached back there, stuck the socket down first followed by a short extension (3 or 4 inch) then the ratchet. I had plenty of room back there that way to turn the ratchet. No swivels or wobble extensions needed.

Also I don't have small hands by any means.

Haven't done plugs on the 04 engine yet, but I can have that intake off and back on again in 20 minutes so it isn't a big deal. This engine only has about 56k miles on it yet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Correct me if I am wrong, but spark plugs really don't require much torque anyway.  Minimal resistance on a ratchet is sufficient, its not something that you really want or need to crank on. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IntechE_zps319f9b66.jpg

Intech looks to be a beast but not really. Remove the brace and then need 3 3" extensions with good detent balls and socket with good rubber grip for pulling the plug. Have to feed one extension on at a time holding one and adding the next and not to drop the whole thing. So, after 3 extensions and a socket, the top sticks out just right for a rachet. I use 3/8" drive. I have a flex shaft grabber in case I loose one down there. I attached my 3/8" rachet and a beam torque wrench together with a socket on each and a long hex nut in both. Then practiced about the right pull on the rachet to equal ~14 ftlb. Significant pull since I am pulling about 6" out on the rachet handle. I would say to loosen a plug well used takes maybe twice that much to break it free. Done 2 INTECH engines now and 2 Duratecs. I should be through this for a long time.

 

As to the Duartec when I pull the intake, I stuff a paper towel in each hole of the lower intake to be sure not to drop things in there. I remember a guy back in the day, big Pontiac V-8 he took the air cleaner off and used the nut to prop the choke open a bit to start it when it was flooded. Pop and it sucked the nut right down and into a cylinder. Made a bit of a racket he said. Nut was sheet metal but do not know where that went. Some times good to learn from other's errors.

 

-chart-

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Correct me if I am wrong, but spark plugs really don't require much torque anyway.  Minimal resistance on a ratchet is sufficient, its not something that you really want or need to crank on.

There technically is a torque spec for spark plugs. But, I believe it was one of my auto textbooks, said to use the 2 finger method if a specification cannot be found. With two fingers on the ratchet pull until snug. They really don't need to be very tight, just enough to get a proper seal and prevent it from backing out again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have little patience for such things, I was told you can do a V6 (Vulcan) Tempo's plugs on the rear bank without removing upper intake. I sure as hell couldn't do, lol, but others on tempotopaz.com claimed to be able to. In that car, removing or just barely relocating the upper intake manifold is relatively simple, and nets you tons of room.

 

The second time I did it, I took the opportunity to clean the upper intake manifold which had a thick film of black gunk on it. I replaced the intake manifold gasket then but I do remember reusing the gasket the first time.  I remember during the first time that the front three plugs were aftermarket and the back three plugs were OEM. LOL, somebody gave up. 

 

Edit: That's a good rule to remember Vash, I'll have to keep that in mind. I knew you didn't crank down on them too hard but I was afraid to go too lightly and have them back out.

Edited by JohnTaurus

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Fixed" the blower motor in the 94 today. Quit the other day when it was sub-zero temps. Smacked the heater box a few times today and it starts right up like there was never anything wrong.

New blend door actuater on the way from Rockauto for the 97 Sable too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There technically is a torque spec for spark plugs. But, I believe it was one of my auto textbooks, said to use the 2 finger method if a specification cannot be found. With two fingers on the ratchet pull until snug. They really don't need to be very tight, just enough to get a proper seal and prevent it from backing out again.

LinPlugB13_zps096f37d6.jpg

 

Hope to never see one of these again. This was not tight, factory original. Only one. 11 years old.

When removing, it was finger loose. No pull required to move it.

Two specs, 1/16 turn after finger tight, and the other is 10-14 ft lb. For 3/8" rachet with 6" to center of pulling force, take about 25# pull.

 

-chart-

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got her brushed off as well as I could to go to work tomorrow. She's got about a half inch of ice stuck to most of her.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oil change and tire rotation at school!

Oil: Motorcraft blend, Filter: Motorcraft FL400S 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like Motorcraft filters. I always use em. Even put them on my grandfather's Chevy :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like Motorcraft filters. I always use em. Even put them on my grandfather's Chevy :P

 

Where do you buy Motorcraft filters in those sizes? I asked a dealership once and they wanted $8 for it... if I'm going to that trouble and expense to get an oil filter I'll buy a Baldwin.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well a lot of different manufacturers oil filters will fit different brands of cars. I know Motorcraft filters fit a wide variety of cars. You can get 3-4 different motorcraft filters at a well stocked walmart.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know that the dealers in Green Bay sell the FL 1995 for the same price as Walmart, one of the largest of the Motorcraft filters.  I have bought numerous FL820S filters for under $4.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The few standard Ford filters don't fit much beyond Ford products and some Mopars, if I recall.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×