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Alright, this is possibly a question no one's had yet for y'all, but, can a 2005 Vulcan V6 OHC handle an extra 130cfm of air induction? I've heard of people wanting to turbo them, I've heard it's possible. But, if one was to create a Forced air induction system, that actually forced more air, would it push the compression too high? The extra air would be monitered by the MAF sensor, so the computer'd know it was getting extra air, but if on the highway, extra air was introduced, would it be fine?

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There was someone on tcca that did turbo his vulcan. It seemed to do fine except the headgaskets kept blowing (he also added a stroker kit which had stronger internals). He eventually gave up and sold the turbo kit as he couldn't afford to keep replacing them. I believe he spent somewhere around $10,000 on the setup by the time he sold it. So it is doable just be prepared to shell out lots of cash for a decent setup and some durable headgaskets. You would also need larger fuel injectors as the stock ones would max out real fast. As for the internals, if the boost level is relatively low they should handle it. But if you are talking about the boost levels I think you are then you would have to replace the internals with stronger parts. The Vulcan has a lower compression ratio of 9.3:1 so adding some boost is possible, just expensive.

Also, the Vulcan is an OHV engine, not OHC. Completely different design from the block up.

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So, why the title's Redneckery, say I run a custom intake tube, that still has the two vaccuum lines to it, and still has the MAF sensor, then a tube fan on a switch, then a filter, and only ran the fan on on the highway or during high load periods, would it push the head gaskets?

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What we're looking at doing:

Throttle Body-Tubing-Vaccuum pipe section with the two vaccuum tubes into it-MAF sensor-Inline Fantubing-Spectre Filter

The Tube-Fan is a 3 inch "Bilge Fan" pushing 130cfm max.

And the MAF sensor would pick up the extra air.

And the fan would be on a switch so it could be engaged only say high load times, like going uphill, or on the highway at high speeds.

Safe?

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130cfm, compared to a turbo, how many "Lbs" would that be?

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So. 130cfm would be about 9Lbs of pressure?

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a bilge fan will not create 9lbs of boost... 0.9lbs maybe.

Where did you come up with that number anyway?

130cfm is measured with no restriction / no load. A bilge fan does not have the power to pressurize air. Put a restriction in front of the fan and CFM drops to 0.

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Where do people get that boost causes the compression ratio to change? This isn't the first I've heard it.

Are we really talking electric super/turbo right now?

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The Vulcan is an Overhead Valve not Overhead Cam

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Where do people get that boost causes the compression ratio to change? This isn't the first I've heard it.

Are we really talking electric super/turbo right now?

To be technical, turbo does not change compresion ratio as that is mechanical in the engine design.

That ratio = certain compression pressures at stmospheric air pressure, so the issue to the engine is peak pressure.

Turbo adds more than atmospheric pressure to the intake stroke, thus making more peak pressure with the same comp ratio.

Thus preignition and the need to change the spark advance.

Just trying to keep the terms straight.

Opinion: most people trying to change their power plant fail. It is just for fun and ego.

-chart-

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I realized it's OHV not OHC, grammatical error.

I read online 130cfm calculated out to about 9lbs of pressure somewhere, I'm not entirely sure if it's true or not, probably not seeing how a 3" fan couldn't possibly create as much boost as a turbo...

And yes, this project is basically, I saw this in a parts store, this fan, and thought, higher air in the intake is something that's supposed to increase mileage and somewhat power, then why not create a force of air, packing as much air as possible at high rpms?

So is it safe to say, that reguardless, this won't blow my engine. It'll either do good things, or nothing at all?

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And I've heard about preignition, spark timing in this would be controlled by the computer if the MAF sensed more air right?

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And I've heard about preignition, spark timing in this would be controlled by the computer if the MAF sensed more air right?

The engines PCM (powertrain control module) will adjust the spark within it's designed range. When you add more air than the engine was designed to intake, you will likely exceed the MAF range and ability to retard the spark for "outside the operating range" parameters.

-chart-

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Go over to TCCA and look up the user "Jimmer"... he has a vulcan motor in a racing shop right now upgrading it so he can make it forced induction He already has a 5 speed manual trans put in to take the extra power. He's looking at adding QUITE a bit of HP to his motor. It's basically the same motor but completely upgraded and rebuilt so at the same time it really isn't.

It's pretty cool. He's going to have spent $30-40k in all when it's done on the car, and I don't even know if that includes the purchase price of the Taurus!

You will need a new, custom programmed PCM to do it correctly. Probably a new MAF sensor and other sensors as well.

The electric tubo has been debunked many times. They just don't work. In some cars they actually lower power or won't even let the car start because of reduced idle airflow.

So if you want to do forced induction, be prepared to spend A LOT on it or be prepared to destroy your motor or be prepared to get NO gains whatsoever.

Edited by breeves002

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I have a few turbos under a few hoods ATM. I understand how it works.

I just don't know where this compression ratio changing came from. It doesn't make sense.

The issue with the Vulcan is weaker head gaskets. They were never designed to handle anything above atmospheric pressure along with bad tuning. 9 psi is a lot of boost and a fan won't create that. The old 7MGTE Supra ran around there from factory. They used a turbo because you have to.

Think of it this way. 1 atmosphere is 14.7 psi, this is what all engines run on out of boost. When you add 9 psi you are shoving 23.7 psi into that motor. Do you feel as though a small electric fan can do that? Do you feel like a Vulcan that is otherwise stock can do that?

The MAF on the Vulcan, I've heard, doesn't have a lot of head room. Then you need to talk about more fuel when you max the MAF. Usually boosted vehicles run 1 pound of fuel for 1 pound of boost.

Then you go farther into fuel maps and then you get into spark tables.

The actual turbo and all can be had cheap, it's the fuel pump, the fuel regulator, the injectors, and all of the tuning is why it's expensive.

My Thunderbird has hit 26 PSI and I have dabbled in a few things.

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God. I hate to teach people this sh1t because then they blow their stuff up and someone blames me for SHOing them how.

A simple 12:1 FMU will do the trick on mildly boosted Ford motors. An "FMU" is a Fuel Management Unit" which jacks up the fuel pressure in the fuel line. The ratio number is how much the unit reacts per pound of boost applied. In the case of 12:1 it means for every 1 pound of boost, the pressure on the fuel rail will be raised 12 psi, which will result in a larger spray of fuel out of the fuel injector. Add 5 pounds of boost, the fuel rail will increase 60 psi above stock pressure and the injectors will dump a LOT more fuel.

This is done on stock programming.

Add air pressure any way you want. When it appears, the FMU will add a safe amount of fuel to compensate for the added boost air. I've done 3 different types of supercharging on our motors and the 12:1 FMU is a near perfect match for our cars' fuel curves.

That said, Your tranny won't last a thousand miles with a boosted motor. Mine lasted 162 miles at 15 pounds Eaton M 90 roots style boost.

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I don't think he will blow his stuff up. If he thinks a small fan will provide enough boost to shove 9 psi into a 3.0 he doesn't have the technical abilities to do this.

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With the 9psi ordeal, I was going off of someone elses conversions. I don't feel a 130cfm 12v fan is going to create as much boost as a turbo, it'll only up the airflow, drawing more air into the throttle body. I'm almost certain it'll do either nothing, or increase gas mileage and power, just like a higher flow intake filter would. Which is the whole point of doing this. So when I'm on a 4 hour, cruise control at 70mph drive, I can turn on the fan, getting more air and better mileage. I do not want to turbo my car, I'll save that kind of project for my 92 Grand Am which is already set up for high compression, racing style performance.I'm just trying to get the best mileage from my Taurus. Right now at 75mph cruise control on a semi flat stretch of 15 mile highway, I get 27mpg, and in the city I get 16-17.

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And @three50one, I don't appreciate you bashing on my technical abilities seeing how I've rebuilt entire running and high performance engines from the ground up, a 96 Ford V6 and a 90 302 as well as have owned, fixed up, and sold more than 8 cars now at the age of 19. The whole point of these forums is to learn, and seek advice from other car owners, and that is what I am doing. This is the newest engine I've ran, so it's an entirely different beast to learn about.

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And @three50one, I don't appreciate you bashing on my technical abilities seeing how I've rebuilt entire running and high performance engines from the ground up, a 96 Ford V6 and a 90 302 as well as have owned, fixed up, and sold more than 8 cars now at the age of 19. The whole point of these forums is to learn, and seek advice from other car owners, and that is what I am doing. This is the newest engine I've ran, so it's an entirely different beast to learn about.

OK here from the "old coot" been there done that and don't remember some of it.

Congrats, repeat CONGRATS for your thinking.

Anyone who has ever built, designed, made something new and great, was told: "you can't do that" and this is why..................

They will be right on why most of the time.

Helps to listen but never quit your idea. Modify it to meet reality.

I started out with '35, '37, '39 Fords and took all the engines apart to try to build one usable. NOTHING interchanged. I had enough good parts, they were all different in how the flat heads were designed. Sold the whole pile.

Started over with a '50 Ford 6 cylinder. Put on two one barrel carbs on aluminum intake, water heated and it would match the V-8's, drag, and top end. Not for too long though. Then I had this wild idea. Let one carb stay at idle and power on 3 cylinders and progressive the other carb to ratchet up at half throttle.

Oh well, it was a learning experience.

Anyway, keep on keeping on.

-chart-

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If you think I was bashing that is on you.

If you think a small electric fan in the intake will do nothing or increase anything you are also wrong. You will have put a rather large restriction in path and decrease performance.

I was also stating you don't have the technical ability to force 9 psi into a motor that did not come boosted from factory.

I have no doubt you can put a fan on the intake.

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Now that I have a better idea what you are talking about I'm rather sure it would not be beneficial at all. If you ran the engine at low speeds all the time it might help a little but with the car at highway speeds the engine is running much closer to its point of greatest volumetric efficiency. Any object in the intake will actually hurt performance at this point unless it is specifically designed for a car.

The average turbo spins at 100,000+ rpm to provide adequate boost. The average electric fan runs at roughly 1/10 that speed. Even if it can push 130 cfm it won't be spinning fast enough to keep any of the extra air it's moving inside the intake. It will just run back out and cause turbulence in the air hose. The volume of air you move with a fan isn't what matters, it's the speed the fan is spinning to provide enough force behind the air to make sure it actually goes into the engine.

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Now that I have a better idea what you are talking about I'm rather sure it would not be beneficial at all. If you ran the engine at low speeds all the time it might help a little but with the car at highway speeds the engine is running much closer to its point of greatest volumetric efficiency. Any object in the intake will actually hurt performance at this point unless it is specifically designed for a car.

The average turbo spins at 100,000+ rpm to provide adequate boost. The average electric fan runs at roughly 1/10 that speed. Even if it can push 130 cfm it won't be spinning fast enough to keep any of the extra air it's moving inside the intake. It will just run back out and cause turbulence in the air hose. The volume of air you move with a fan isn't what matters, it's the speed the fan is spinning to provide enough force behind the air to make sure it actually goes into the engine.

From the practical side, consider a leaf blower.

12A at 120V produces ~400 cfm at maybe 1 pound or less.

For 12V easy head math means 120 amps to do that with an electric motor.

If you had 130A rated alternator, making 87 amps at road speed, take away 25 amps for the car and climate control, and you are way in the hole for electric.

Do not think Vulcans use 130A rated alt, more likely 105A rated.

And for mpg, the feet make mpg. The one/ones on the pedals. Any quick movement of the accel takes the closed loop momentarily out of optimum.

It takes gas to recover from the braking. Off the gas early to reduced braking saves mpg.

But I still think someone is thinking outside the box, and that is a good thing.

-chart-

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I don't really understand what your trying to do other than something with a supercharger, but cant you put a supercharger/turbo on a sho motor? If so, wouldn't it be easier to do a sho swap, and put the supercharger/turbo on that?

Anyways good luck

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But I still think someone is thinking outside the box, and that is a good thing.

-chart-

While I commend for thinking outside of the box the research has previously been done with much more expensive and specialized equipment with negative impact on performance.

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