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Hurricane Sandy Damaged Vehicles

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I could live with that, as I hate to see resources wasted. However if memory serves me, in the early 1980's GM tried to sell Malibu's in the Middle East. These cars were equipped with air conditioning and a three-speed, floor shift manual and not much else. The crap "Iraqi Taxi" did not sell, and GM proceeded to sell them over here. Except here, everybody wanted automatics. So not sure what happened to them. And the chances of them accepting water damage is small. The only country where there may still be a market is in Kazakhstan (old Soviet bloc).

The one thing that always impressed me was how Europeans could get option combinations we could only dream about. In Kiev (Ukraine) I spotted a Stratus sedan with a manual transmission and diesel power. Available in Europe, but not here. When we rented a car to get to our assigned observation district, only one of us had any experience with manuals (the fact he also had his International Driver's Permit with him also helped). Here, you would not find a manual if your life depended on it.

I drove a rental Ford in England for about a week in 1989. As the car of the day there, they used only high test leaded gas, manual 4 speed. They started and ran like the muscle cars of the US in the 60's. Manual choke, They were hard to start, and idled like the old muscle cars, in a lope, and if you did not rev it poperly to start off, you got a dead engine that did not want to restart. Once moving they would rev up and hall @#%$ just like the old muscle cars. Out on the 4 lane you could drive 90mph but the wind could get you in a bind. Winter along the North Sea is an experience.

But, the radio in England was all Gov run and only AM so cars did not have FM radios. There were however, private stations on ships in the North Sea with usable broadcast and the Gov could not stop them. Some FM but the Gov did not allow FM radios in cars. Anyone want to listen to Gov run radio?

So, in the US we had auto chokes in the 50's, fuel inj in the early 80's and Taurus had mulitport injection while they over across the pond had non of this.

Just my memory.

-chart-

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Dealership cars are paid for by insurance companies just like any personal vehicle would be and then they are sent to the same auctions as all the other salvaged cars go to when they are totaled. Good chance some brand new cars will be coming up for auction soon as insurance totals....

Jeff

CarFax will show the title train. New cars will show the date of delivery to the dealer. Then if insurance takes title, or they may be first tiltle holder, then they will get a red title if recovered, but the title will be shown in CarFax if it is a NY title car. NY law requires all insurance totals to be reported to the state and that will show in CarFax as they get the records. Insurers must turn totaled cars over to a "totaled" auction. From there, they can be rebuilt but must be inspected before a new title can be issued. When looking for my two car buys in 2011, I saw many CarFax listings, some totaled by wreck, falling objects, flooding.

Once the carpet gets wet, they it is a really difficult job to fix one up. That moulds quickly. Note, these cars will sit for a while before being acutioned, then a few at a time as that would be overload to the special auctions. For more expensive cars, they can replace the seats, floor covering, and door panels, but that is rather expensive, even if you have a doner car.

Cautious buyer can find out what they are buying.

-chart-

-chart-

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I drove a rental Ford in England for about a week in 1989. As the car of the day there, they used only high test leaded gas, manual 4 speed. They started and ran like the muscle cars of the US in the 60's. Manual choke, They were hard to start, and idled like the old muscle cars, in a lope, and if you did not rev it poperly to start off, you got a dead engine that did not want to restart. Once moving they would rev up and hall @#%$ just like the old muscle cars. Out on the 4 lane you could drive 90mph but the wind could get you in a bind. Winter along the North Sea is an experience.

But, the radio in England was all Gov run and only AM so cars did not have FM radios. There were however, private stations on ships in the North Sea with usable broadcast and the Gov could not stop them. Some FM but the Gov did not allow FM radios in cars. Anyone want to listen to Gov run radio?

So, in the US we had auto chokes in the 50's, fuel inj in the early 80's and Taurus had mulitport injection while they over across the pond had non of this.

Just my memory.

-chart-

Cars in the United Kingdom at best were some of the worst I have ever driven. The electrical system left much to be desired. For example, the wipers on the Aston-Martin, although electric, did not have an auto-park system built in. When you switched the wipers off, they stopped right there. This must have something to do with the fact the market is closed (i.e. different than the rest of Europe.)

However radios did have multiband capability. In our Renault, we had LW (Long Wave), MW (Medium Wave - our regular AM), SW (Short Wave) and FM. We mostly listened to FM in the cities (mostly music) and MW when out in the boonies.

The Renault also had four-wheel disk brakes,

Some European cars had direct port injection back in the 1950's (most notable was the Mercedes Gull wing). Multiple overhead camshafts (DOHC) were very rare over here, much more common over there. Our Renault was a "Hemi". Suspension systems were rapidly moving toward full independent. Radials were common (over here not until the mid seventies.)

Key was the need to conserve fuel (prices were very high, except in the Middle East where premium sold for $0.10 per Imperial gallon.) The premium in the Middle East was of much lower quality than our regular. Gasoline was so cheap, in one station early in the morning, the manager was hosing the grease and oil spills off the concrete with gasoline.

Eastern Europe (in 1970-71) had far more smog than any North American city. While in Budapest, we could barely see the water of the Danube below the bridge. By 2004 most of the smog has been cleared up.

One other interesting fact was if I had taken my Mustang over, the annual license and insurance would have been around $1200 in 1970. The higher the horsepower, the higher the fee. (That is where the old Citroën 2CV got its name, it was deux chevaux-vapeur fiscaux or two fiscal horsepower.)

Television notably was a far superior product compared to what we had (1970's) in North America. The colour was true and natural unlike the purple-green crap we had over here. In the 2000's in Ukraine, the TV sets were able to receive PAL, SECAM as well as NTSC (SECAM was French and the old Soviet Union); PAL was German and UK, while NTSC was Japanese and North American. I watched DW (German) and French programming for the most part on a multisystem television set. When one of our group wanted to show some video, he was prepared to have us crowd around the little LCD screen. I asked if he had cables. He did, we hooked his camera to the TV and voila, as nice and clear as if at home.

As Chart said, just my memory. Some things better, some things worse.

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