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What Have You Done To Your Other Vehicle Lately?


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Chrysler first offered push button shifter in the '60s. Somehow they still think it's a good idea.

200 has a knob:

a-200-dash.jpg

 

However, it looks appropriate in the cars that used to have it:

1964-valiant.jpg

 

 

Also, last I checked Lincoln has push button transmission select on the MKZ to the right of the steering wheel, but it is labeled well.

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Work day today for the '97. The brake shudder came back, so I went ahead and decided to see if replacing the brake hardware will eliminate it. Parts fixed/replaced: New calipers on both si

The only trouble is if either of you try showing down on the street no one will think you're racing, just attempting to briskly accelerate.

More mods! Found the part number for the OEM black Charger emblem, so I did a swap. Yes yes, I could have plastidipped it, but this was just as cheap, and won't peel over time.

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Chrysler first offered push button shifter in the '60s. Somehow they still think it's a good idea.

Mercury had push buttons in '57. They were on the left of the wheel on the insturment panel.

Later then had some cool ideas though.

 

-chart-

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An idiocy resulting from the combination of designers having this inexplicable psychosis against column shifters, and a complete inability to comprehend that sometimes a console shift just doesn't work.

 

There's plenty of places for a floor shifter. A van is not one of those places. (Unless it's a stick-shift Aerostar of course)

 

Column shift is viewed as an old person's method of shifting. Personally I like it. Only floor shift I truly like is a stick shift of course. However, I wouldn't be opposed to a three-on-a-tree :)

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The only new vehicles that come to mind that have a standard column shift that aren't police cars are the new F150 and Silverado. I think the Ram has the rotating dial on the dash on all models, the new 2014 Rams we have at work are like that.

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Column shift is viewed as an old person's method of shifting. Personally I like it. Only floor shift I truly like is a stick shift of course. However, I wouldn't be opposed to a three-on-a-tree :)

OpenFront_zpsbf32f71c.jpg

The column shift is essential for us. Wife has had surgery on her right hand, plural, bones fused in her thumb so shifting console is difficult and requires both hands. When she is a passenger, fastening the seat belt is much easier. In this case there are 2 arm rests with pop up tops and storage in both as well as the power port and change holder. The CD disc holder is in the floor mini console which scrolls out with cup holders and junk storage as well as power port #2.

 

I have removed the center seat belts as seen in the pic, They are STUPID.

 

Very practical car.

 

So I have 2 consold shifts, and 2 column shifts.

 

-chart-

 

 

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I'd love to have a Contintenal they are silly cheap cars but ride well and have great power.

UsedLin14_zps0b1f5a3f.jpg

Just grabbed on off my link. I know nothing about this, but if it was a Taurus it would be $6K.

And only a few Bulls driven 6-7K per year since new.

Very different steering feel, even though the suspension looks the same as in sturt/spring. The geometery is different.

They have a stronger self centering in forward, and the opposite backing. They want to turn to the stop backing. The low speed effort is quite a bit lighter than the G-4. You can select the effort at speed in 3 levels, but parking lot speed is always light.

I think they got the engine sound just right. Kind of like the old 4BBL V-8's that were silent until the secondary open. But the frequency is double. And it does have double TB with progressive linkage. Kind of like the old 4BBL tame on the primary, agressive on the secondary.

 

But not for most of us, or the prices would be much higher.

And you can still fine a formal roof. :pat:

-chart-

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Mercury had push buttons in '57. They were on the left of the wheel on the insturment panel.

Later then had some cool ideas though.

-chart-

I read once that the push buttons in the Mercury were intended for disabled former soldiers returning from Korea.

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I had a 62 Rambler with push buttons to the left of the steering wheel. My first car out of highschool. I think my parents paid around $500 for it.. big money back in those days... (I bet there's only 3-4 people here old enough to remember Ramblers !! )

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I had a 62 Rambler with push buttons to the left of the steering wheel. My first car out of highschool. I think my parents paid around $500 for it.. big money back in those days... (I bet there's only 3-4 people here old enough to remember Ramblers !! )

1 here.

I test drove one in '63 new. It had a flat head engine, bypass oil filter on the side of the block. It did have OD and 3 speed column.

Flat heads left the market by ~'54 and full flow cartrige screw on filters about the same time.

Decided to buy a Fairlane 500, 260V8. Hardtop.

 

Oh well.

 

-chart-

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I had a 62 Rambler with push buttons to the left of the steering wheel. My first car out of highschool. I think my parents paid around $500 for it.. big money back in those days... (I bet there's only 3-4 people here old enough to remember Ramblers !! )

I know OF the Ramblers. ;)

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Changed oil in the '01 Dakota. Used 5w-20 along with AutoRx. I felt the cooler weather and highway use allowed the thin oil. I'll change the filter in 1500 miles and switch back to 10w-30 after 3000. I'm curious to see if the mileage improves as well. Currently at 19mpg with mostly highway use.

Speaking to my buddy who owns a mechanic shop in Austin, he says aftermarket warranties will not warranty the Dodge / Jeep 4.7L V8, apparently due to a high rate of failures caused by oiling issues. I'm at 135K now. I asked when he suggested replacing the timing chains (SOHC engine) and he said 100K. I reminded him that I took it to his shop several years ago around 110K for this very reason and he said there was nothing to worry about at the time. So, fingers crossed. If I decide to keep the truck, I'll invest in replacing the timing components and oil pump. Otherwise, I may try to sell it next summer.

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Is that the "PowerTech" motor. We have an 04 at work but I think it has the 3.7L, same engine that's in the Liberty.

Any 4.7L V8 is the same PowerTech engine for each Chrysler Group application.

IIRC, it was used in the Dodge Dakota, Durango, Ram, Chrysler Aspen, Jeep Grand Cherokee, and Commander.

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WTF? Yesterday the Taurus drivers door would not latch closed in the morning, then in the afternoon the brake light switch stated to fail and the shifter would not go out of 'Park'. Then, today my Jeep took on a quart of water on the passenger side floor during heavy rain. Haven't had car issues for months-none. Again, WTF?

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Yes the PowerTech, this is an early build and branded "Next Generation Magnum." I like the engine, especially paired with the manual transmission. It revs out more than bigger V8s making glorious noise. Gas mileage is above average too. We use this truck to haul well over its rated load. The truck's Achilles heel are the small brakes, so downshifting and plenty of stopping distance is required. Accelerating is never a problem.

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That was the idea behind switching to OHC from OHV.

The straight 6 in the Grand Cherokee is actually branded a "PowerTech". Right on the air intake, 4.0L PowerTech. I think that's the only non OHC engine under that name. Don't really need a name on that motor since it's so distinctive.

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Sounds like a classic Ford Modular engine problem, lucky you didn't strip the head out.

Usually the trouble is on the Performance Improved heads, not the Non Performance Improved heads like mine. Usually when they blow out, they take the threads with them due to over tightening, simply because there is only about four or five threads holding the plug in an aluminum head.

 

This was the first time the car actually broke down on the side of the road, since I had no intentions on trying to make it on seven cylinders the way it was. A few years ago when the intake manifold ruptured and started loosing coolant, I was at least able to make it home.

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I don't think it matters which heads, they are all a poor design, any F150, Expedition, Panther car, Super Duty, and E Series. Any vehicle with a 2 valve modular engine is at risk, Including the V10s. From the day those motors hit the road until the early 2000s. Then when they fixed that problem they created more problems with the 3 Valve engines.

I feel bad for people who had a V10 van or motor home and maybe even the Super duty and had plugs blow. Only solution is to pull the cab to replace the heads.

Hopefully you don't have more blow out that's not a fun problem to deal with.

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I don't think it matters which heads, they are all a poor design, any F150, Expedition, Panther car, Super Duty, and E Series. Any vehicle with a 2 valve modular engine is at risk, Including the V10s. From the day those motors hit the road until the early 2000s. Then when they fixed that problem they created more problems with the 3 Valve engines.

Fortunate the issue did not carry over to the Intech or Duratec.

I have changed plugs in 4 Duratec's and 2 Intech's. I was uncomfortable with the thread engagement and the torque of aluminum. I am ok with that now.

LinPlugB13_zps096f37d6.jpg

The point of this last Intech was this plug. It was not tight, but not loose. Just enough it did not seal and combustion gas slipped by and condensed. When the water level got too deep it did not run right. Add to the fact one plug on the other bank was the wrong heat range and showed signs of overheat. This is just crap quality of assy from Lin. All others I removed in all cars were tight, equal feel to loosen them. There is a fairly wide range of torque allowed.

On the Lin, I went back a year later and pulled the one plug and checked for any issues. None.

 

I personally do not like the idea of half thread plugs, and the short thread engagement, but it seems to work.

 

And I see no reason Autolite can not make the top electrode the right size on all their plugs. Caused me enough pain.

 

-chart-

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Checked the rest of the spark plugs.

MFW I checked them: :smiley5:

About 5 out of the 8 plugs had backed out around halfway or so. I was driving a plug shooting time bomb for about 20k after I did the plugs. I'm surprised it ran as well as it did.

When I did the plugs then, I was worried about stripping them, so I followed the rule of tighten until snug, and then only ever so much more because I don't have a torque wrench. Bad idea. I hope no damage has occurred to the threads, although everything seemed to tighten down fine.  

Top of Christmas list: Torque Wrench. No exceptions.

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Checked the rest of the spark plugs.

MFW I checked them: :smiley5:

About 5 out of the 8 plugs had backed out around halfway or so. I was driving a plug shooting time bomb for about 20k after I did the plugs. I'm surprised it ran as well as it did.

When I did the plugs then, I was worried about stripping them, so I followed the rule of tighten until snug, and then only ever so much more because I don't have a torque wrench. Bad idea. I hope no damage has occurred to the threads, although everything seemed to tighten down fine.  

Top of Christmas list: Torque Wrench. No exceptions.

For what it is worth:

I had a fear of the unknown when I first did Duratec plugs. Not rational as I had done plugs in Essex which is aluminum also, just not down in the well.

 

I was at the JY and knew they had a pile of engines pulled in the back for recycle. I found Duratec and pulled a plug, put it back and torqued it by feel, pulled it and saw how how much the remove torque is to the install troque. Then used a 16" breaker bar and pulled it down to about what a lug nut would be = 100#. Removed it and all is OK, so I repeated and about all I could pull = #200. Bit hard to remove, but no harm.

 

So now I am comfortable using a 3/8" rachet and pulling hard. Short handle so ~ 35-40#.

 

So I have done 6  cars and no issues.

 

-chart-

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