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Scuba9898

What Have You Done To Your Other Vehicle Lately?

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But it's a Dodge. :huh:

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But it's a Dodge. :huh:

 

The end to all arguments concerning this car is "...its got a Hemi."

 

/thread

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The end to all arguments concerning this car is "...its got a Hemi."

 

/thread

 

Which I'm sure will be of great comfort while the rest of the car disintegrates around you. :P 

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Which I'm sure will be of great comfort while the rest of the car disintegrates around you. :P

 

Its got a Hemi, it goes like Hell, buy one.

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2 plugs per cylinder...no thank you.

Why Ford went that route on the 6.2L is beyond me.

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2 plugs per cylinder...no thank you. Why Ford went that route on the 6.2L is beyond me.

 

Same reasoning for both...they are waste-spark systems with the second plug firing during the exhaust stroke.

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Same reasoning for both...they are waste-spark systems with the second plug firing during the exhaust stroke.

Actually no, there would be no point to fire during the exhaust stroke as the gas is already escaping the combustion chamber. The second spark is during the second half of the" power stroke". This is what Chrysler claims, although it makes sense the spark occurs during the exhaust stroke since the cylinders should be opposite. The spark isn't wasted though, it is required because the engine can't achieve complete combustion with one spark plug so to burn all the fuel it needs two spark plugs.

I personally see this as a poor design. An engine should be able to achieve complete combustion with 1 spark plug. It's just a way to make the engine run cleaner because 1 initial spark couldn't do the job.

Both are good engines and pull well but I just simply can't get over the fact that the engine requires an extra spark to burn all the fuel.

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Actually no, there would be no point to fire during the exhaust stroke as the gas is already escaping the combustion chamber. The second spark is during the second half of the" power stroke". This is what Chrysler claims, although it makes sense the spark occurs during the exhaust stroke since the cylinders should be opposite. The spark isn't wasted though, it is required because the engine can't achieve complete combustion with one spark plug so to burn all the fuel it needs two spark plugs. I personally see this as a poor design. An engine should be able to achieve complete combustion with 1 spark plug. It's just a way to make the engine run cleaner because 1 initial spark couldn't do the job. Both are good engines and pull well but I just simply can't get over the fact that the engine requires an extra spark to burn all the fuel.

 

Used to be common on aircraft engines. They timed the second plug slightly later than the first plug. Two magnetos so safety issue also there was some reson for the split timeing.

-chart-

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Wouldn't firing the first plug twice produce the same effect?

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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Wouldn't firing the first plug twice produce the same effect?

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 They start two flame fronts with a tiny bit of separation in time. Number of vehicles used dual plugs.

"Dual ignition promotes engine efficiency by initiating twin flame fronts, giving faster and more complete burning and thereby increasing power.."

Quote from somewhere.

-chart-

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They start two flame fronts with a tiny bit of separation in time. Number of vehicles used dual plugs.

"Dual ignition promotes engine efficiency by initiating twin flame fronts, giving faster and more complete burning and thereby increasing power.."

Quote from somewhere.

-chart-

so what you're saying is, I drill into my Vulcan block to add a second plug to every cylinder, and another coil pack timed slightly after my original pack. To produce more power!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

*cries*

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Big displacement engine with a large area for the combustion chamber benefits from the dual spark.

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There is no benefit in increased power for either of those engines, if there is it's so minimal you wouldn't notice, it's strictly for emissions.

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My brother had a Dual Spark Mazda/Ford Ranger, he quit changing the "waste" spark plugs since changing those out involved taking the intake apart, never once did a Check engine come on, or other problems.

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I had one of those rangers too. It ran way better after changing those plugs which were the factory ones.

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Also, go figure, gasoline has skyrocketed since I have been driving my Supercoupe that LOVES premium fuel :(

 

 

It's $3.50 a gallon for premium. I think it is time for the Supercoupe to take a break. Must get my motorcycle running again.

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88 Octane fuel is considered premium? I think the Essex would detonate... :(

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85 Octane... Wtf? I wouldn't even put that in my lawn mower.

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I didn't realize at first, I just grabbed the unleaded nozzle. Then I noticed the car was running like complete crap, then I saw the 85 sticker.

 

Apparently it worked better in carbeurated cars. Of course the gas companies love being able to sell 85 for 87 prices.

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I would imagine there aren't many carburetor cars on the road today... Just a wild guess, but I am going to put my money on EFI/GDI being the majority on the roads today.

I have however driven cars with carburetors, they ran fine with 87 Octane...

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Changed the supercoupe's oil. Black oil came out of her, and almost 5 quarts of oil. That means, my 1989 S/C Essex has no gasket failure yet, and no leaks. Even underneath her was super clean. :)

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