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So a local used auto dealer has been broadcasting some fairly old commercials on the local channels. The cars and appearance of the background would put those recordings in the late-'90s/early-'00s.

 

I should try recording them just cause. The cool factor of the commercials isn't the corny content, but seeing back down the street, as a lot has been developed around that area over the last 16 years since my family moved to Augusta.

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Starting a new business with an old friend. He currently owns and operates a small auto repair shop in south Austin. His current location is too small to meet demand so he has been wanting to expand.

Finally looking at a job "upgrade", at least for me. Got a conditional job offer from O'Reilly Auto Parts making considerably more than what I do now at Zaxby's with the added potential of being able

Its a rental car, remember it gets the piss beat out of it... Don't be gentle its a rental.

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Had to cancel an order for a wiper arm because Dorman can't do model years correctly. I almost was about to let an order for a passenger side arm for the Boxes ('79-'91) go through and caught myself, because I ran the part number in Dorman's checker. It looked like the 1992 style arm I need (pin arm, yes, let the hate for them flow, but they've been the most suitable since I've had my debacle with the damn wipers), but wasn't.

 

Simply put, Dorman groups the 1992 CV/GM with the '79-'91s for wiper arms, leaving a gray area if you want that style arm for your CV/GM.

 

I found the solution, and that is to order one for a '90-'93 Town Car, because they use the arms that the '92 CV/GM cars did. Hopefully the arm for my 1990 Town Car :rofl: should solve my issue once and for all. It would just seem that where the arm mounts slowly deforms the latch until there is some serious play at the mount point. You can get around that on these cars by bending the arm some for additional pressure, but you can only go so far before it's no longer do able.

 

 

 

 

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Dorman sucks at entering model year information and I have to order wiper arms for '90-'93 Town Cars for the style I need because the car is an asshole.

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I sometimes have to look up parts for a Grand Marquis on RockAuto because some LTD (II) parts are listed under the fullsize - shock absorbers, for one.

 

It would just seem that where the arm mounts slowly deforms the latch until there is some serious play at the mount point. You can get around that on these cars by bending the arm some for additional pressure, but you can only go so far before it's no longer do able.

 

I wonder if that's why the driver's side wiper on my '95 never worked above 55 MPH...

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I wonder if that's why the driver's side wiper on my '95 never worked above 55 MPH...

You're the second person today to have said that their Aero had wiper trouble. Mine was afflicted past 40 MPH.

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I had to look up front struts for an 09 Taurus because both RockAuto and even the manufacturer, Gabriel, said that they would not fit an 09 Sable. Of course they do! I'm not quite sure why even Gabriel says they don't. It seems this happens quite often as I work in parts. Some of my catalogs aren't even complete or it has no listing, but research online or other places will produce a part number and low and behold I either have it on the shelf or can get it.

EDIT: I don't work for Autozone.....I just got an extremely good deal on Gabriel struts on Amazon.

Jeff

Edited by Jeff
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Note that the 97 GL has PA stickers in the window but it's in TN...hmm...but it's a "rare" high spec GL with moonroof and leather.  Price is rather strong.  I see mint late Gen 3s grabing barely $4,000 on eBay...with similar mileage.  They'd be lucky to see $3,500.

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It's just a beautiful gen 3. I had a '97 GL in Toreador Red with tan seats too, but I didn't get leather, a sunroof, or keyless entry. The SHO is gorgeous, and I don't like white cars much lol.

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Note that the 97 GL has PA stickers in the window but it's in TN...hmm...but it's a "rare" high spec GL with moonroof and leather.  Price is rather strong.  I see mint late Gen 3s grabing barely $4,000 on eBay...with similar mileage.  They'd be lucky to see $3,500.

My take on the dealer. Any one "buy here pay here" I would not even look at.

 

Just my experience.

 

-chart-

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Been to the drug store for my 3 month pharma. Only one I take.

$6 for 3 momths.

 

If every other old coots were like me, there would be very few drug stores.

 

-chart-

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This Patriot Blue or French Blue Sable LS really made my Medium True Blue car look drab and boring, it was actually quite depressing how dull my car looked next to it. The elderly man driving it must really take care of it because it was in perfect shape for a UP car.

 

BTW that is the second tallest building in the UP in the background, she's a record breaker, lol.  I think 13 or 14 floors, not sure since I rarely go in there, only the black magic of Mechanical engineering occurs there.

 

IMG_0687_zps3ku15vv0.jpg

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"If every other old coots were like me, there would be very few drug stores."

 

I get calls from Express Scrips (or whatever the current mail order drug company is ) wanting me to convert "all" my prescriptions. I explain there is no "all" since I'm not on any medications even at my ripe old age. Now if they'd cover my vitamins etc we could do some business. 

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100_2823_zps0977d3c4.jpg

100_2824_zpsa849b352.jpg

 

Replacaed all this from under the kitchen sink for my daughter last week. And new strainer baskets in the sinks. Old baskets had corroded nuts so I had to cut the nuts with my Dremel and carbide bit. Someone for some reason added extensions from the sink to make the assy low then added an extension after the "P" trap to get it back up high enough to reach the drain. Lots more room under there, and it does not leak. Old one nearly plugged up as the pic shows.

 

******* this old guy to work inside the cabinet.

 

-chart-

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Clock15a_zps8e21602b.jpg

Clock15b_zps1005609e.jpg

Picked this up at a household sale next street over. $40 running condition, wood good, finish needs some restoring.

The business card on the door has phone # with no area, and no name of town or state. Good old days everyone just knew. This era 1900 clock will fit my collection well. I have my own method of finish restoring. Cant remove the finish as the inlay is paper thin. Going to have to check, it might be fake inlay.  Does not matter, I use comet and wet cloths to scrub the finish clean. When really dry I use low gloss varnish thinned to soak into the wood to seal it, several coats. Then use auto rubbing compound to de-gloss the surface.

 

Funny: the minute hand is put on 180 degrees off so it chimes the hour on the half hour. :pat:

Square shaft so you have 4 choices, only one makes sense.

Minute hand attached with a tapered brass pin so easy to change.

 

-chart-

 

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Came into work today and found that the door handle between the dining room and back of house had been broken off (yay Chinesium bolts and excessive force). Couldn't get the handle usable again because the bolts had broken off almost flush with it.

 

So, MacGyver time:

8otFrOc.jpg

 

That's two newish pennies (decided zinc might be easier to try to force a screw into since I only had a basic screw driver at my disposal) and a old neck strap off of a apron that was torn up. The pennies act as washers to prevent the strap from being yanked off from the screws when pulled. This "fix" will probably last a few days until a new handle is installed. 

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Came into work today and found that the door handle between the dining room and back of house had been broken off (yay Chinesium bolts and excessive force). Couldn't get the handle usable again because the bolts had broken off almost flush with it.

 

So, MacGyver time:

 

That's two newish pennies (decided zinc might be easier to try to force a screw into since I only had a basic screw driver at my disposal) and a old neck strap off of a apron that was torn up. The pennies act as washers to prevent the strap from being yanked off from the screws when pulled. This "fix" will probably last a few days until a new handle is installed.

Nice redneck engineering job there. :)

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That is some intense testing, I have never seen snow build up like that inside an engine compartment.  I've packed radiators, suspension, and wheels solid full of snow but I've never seen it get inside the engine compartment. The worst I have ever experienced was with the Explorer a year ago, after stopping and starting again in a snow storm I checked under the hood and saw that the snow/ice had been pushed though or melted though the radiator and formed a sheet of ice on the fan side.  Last winter I froze 6 inches of snow/ice on the aux cooler of the Escape, it never melted off until it warmed above freezing, so it was frozen on there for several weeks, could never get it hot enough.

 

Usually the air filter problem is an issue on diesels, I know its fairly common on the 6.0 and 6.4L PSD and most guys recommend running a winter front for that reason.  I could see it being a problem on a car like the GT350 due to its massive open grill and intake to draw as much air as possible but most people will never run it conditions like that.

 

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"If every other old coots were like me, there would be very few drug stores."

 

I get calls from Express Scrips (or whatever the current mail order drug company is ) wanting me to convert "all" my prescriptions. I explain there is no "all" since I'm not on any medications even at my ripe old age. Now if they'd cover my vitamins etc we could do some business. 

 

Meanwhile, I have to go over to the hospital as an outpatient and get an IV far too often.

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That is some intense testing, I have never seen snow build up like that inside an engine compartment.  I've packed radiators, suspension, and wheels solid full of snow but I've never seen it get inside the engine compartment. The worst I have ever experienced was with the Explorer a year ago, after stopping and starting again in a snow storm I checked under the hood and saw that the snow/ice had been pushed though or melted though the radiator and formed a sheet of ice on the fan side.  Last winter I froze 6 inches of snow/ice on the aux cooler of the Escape, it never melted off until it warmed above freezing, so it was frozen on there for several weeks, could never get it hot enough.

 

Usually the air filter problem is an issue on diesels, I know its fairly common on the 6.0 and 6.4L PSD and most guys recommend running a winter front for that reason.  I could see it being a problem on a car like the GT350 due to its massive open grill and intake to draw as much air as possible but most people will never run it conditions like that.

 

 

Back in the mid '90s my dad used to work in claims and insurance. His company car was a Ford Tempo. One winter, he was driving from Ely, MN down to the north shore along Lake Superior in a pretty heavy snowstorm. When he finally arrived where he was staying, he noticed the car sounded different and was shaking a bit. He popped the hood and the entire engine compartment was packed with snow. He said it took a couple dollars worth of quarters at the self-serve car wash to get the engine thawed out. He said the car handled like a champ and he didn't notice anything until he stopped driving. I don't remember if it was the 4 or 6 cylinder Tempo, but my parents had two at different times and really liked them.

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Back in the mid '90s my dad used to work in claims and insurance. His company car was a Ford Tempo. One winter, he was driving from Ely, MN down to the north shore along Lake Superior in a pretty heavy snowstorm. When he finally arrived where he was staying, he noticed the car sounded different and was shaking a bit. He popped the hood and the entire engine compartment was packed with snow. He said it took a couple dollars worth of quarters at the self-serve car wash to get the engine thawed out. He said the car handled like a champ and he didn't notice anything until he stopped driving. I don't remember if it was the 4 or 6 cylinder Tempo, but my parents had two at different times and really liked them.

I can't imagine that, if you stop and it freezes solid your screwed.

Have you ever had it where you go to use the horn and nothing happens and as you keep holding the horn they slowly start making noise as they push/thaw the snow and ice out of them. Several times I've done it for fun and you get some funky noises, squeaks and squeals or faint noises. The Explorer did that pretty often, I guess the horns are mounted where snow can get to them.

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I can't imagine that, if you stop and it freezes solid your screwed. Have you ever had it where you go to use the horn and nothing happens and as you keep holding the horn they slowly start making noise as they push/thaw the snow and ice out of them. Several times I've done it for fun and you get some funky noises, squeaks and squeals or faint noises. The Explorer did that pretty often, I guess the horns are mounted where snow can get to them.

Good case for bulls, you need a good air dam to keep the air flow through the rad and not under. Rad should be warm enough to melt the snow. And if the fans are not running, you do not get all that much air flow through the engine bay.

 

But, back in the day, 1964 in North IN, landlord told me to never park facing west. I took his advice. Fine blowing snow and the big grills and you would get snow right through and on the engine. And the same person came home drunk and parked facing W. I saw it next day. Engine bay just one hunk of ice. He had it towed to a shop where they put it inside with a kerosene heater blowing on it till thawed.

 

Fortunate that the wind nearly came from the west. Blowing snow was a daily event. Not that it snowed, just the same snow kept moving on and on until it piled up on one of the snow fences around the corn fields. My drive way faced east so I just pulled in.

 

I had a new '64 Ford Fairlaine and I got powder snow inside often. Kept a brush to knock the snow off the seats.

 

-chart-

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