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Anyone Know A Easy Way To Find A Shorter Serpentine Belt?


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Hey guys. I'm in need of a new serpentine belt about 1/2" shorter then standard. I believe stock is 85 inches and I need one right around 84 1/2"s. I'm all over the interweb trying to find what I need but maybe someone more part swavy has a easier way to look?

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I have a new alternator with a slightly smaller pulley. The stock belt fits but slips like crazy with AC on. The alternator also has a much bigger load then the stock alt. I will likely go to one of the worthless auto parts stores and shoot one of the employees until they figure out what a belt is then once I get the right size forget it happened. Just hoping I don't have to go through all that. Lol.

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Here's a complete listing of all Gatorback Goodyear Belts

http://www.goodyearep.com/ProductsDetail.aspx?id=3128

4060855

First number is 4 - Probably the type of belt? I dunno

Second 2 numbers are based on the amount of ribs, ours is 06 for 6 ridges.

The last 4 are the belt diameter - 0855 - or 85.5

So if you needed a smaller size, look at Goodyear's list for belts, then just see what the next smaller size is, and there's your part number :)

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Kevin to the rescue! Exactly what I needed. Thanks!

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A Smaller Alternator pulley is better, for it will turn the alternator faster. Leave it!

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A Smaller Alternator pulley is better, for it will turn the alternator faster. Leave it!

Unless the alternator cant spin the proper voltage, he has an Under Drive Crank Pulley, or he has a ton of electrical mods, that makes no sense whatsoever all that will happen is he will kill the car fry the Car Battery and possible the whole Electronics system if he doesn't have a capacitor mounted before the power get the the battery.

the dia of the pulley (original) is 65mm if he lost 1/2" of belt the new pulley is 55mm thats 10mm 118% more RPM out of the Alt...

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Unless the alternator cant spin the proper voltage, he has an Under Drive Crank Pulley, or he has a ton of electrical mods, that makes no sense whatsoever all that will happen is he will kill the car fry the Car Battery and possible the whole Electronics system if he doesn't have a capacitor mounted before the power get the the battery.

the dia of the pulley (original) is 65mm if he lost 1/2" of belt the new pulley is 55mm thats 10mm 118% more RPM out of the Alt...

?

O rly?

The alternator's voltage is regulated, regardless of how fast that alternator is spinning it should not put out any more than the regulator allows.

The alternator generates based on the conditions of the electrical system. You are not going OMG DESTROYZ TEH ELECTRONiCZ AND FRY ZE BATTERY! People with large audio systems require large alternators with small pulleys. Unless he went with a 16-18V alternator, nothing is going to be destroyed and blown up. Please research what you are saying before trying to instill fear of destruction. Guys with 6 300A alternators do not fry anything when they shut the load off. Why? Because the voltage is within tolerance.

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Correct guys. I have a 270XP alternator from DC Power. Does 200amps of power at engine idle and over 270 above 1,500rpm. If i put a bigger pulley on it it would be really ******* the engine at idle.

e8237bbe.jpg

eca91d5c.jpg

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OMG DESTROYZ TEH ELECTRONiCZ AND FRY ZE BATTERY!

Thank you for that Ignorant adaptation of my comment, it really made the grade... :rolleyes:

That being said not all Alternators' have regulated output... (and being that I have not done major electrical system work on "newer" Cars, I did not consider that newer ones are regulated while posting... I HUMBLY APOLOGIZE... -_-)

and If that research isn't done properly IT CAN LEAD FRIED ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS!

ON MY TAURUS FOR EXAMPLE THE ALTERNATOR VOLTAGE IS EXTERNALLY REGULATED! AND IF THAT UNIT GOES BAD OR ISN'T HOOKED UP RIGHT IT WILL FRY MY BATTERY AND ELECTRICS!

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Thank you for that Ignorant adaptation of my comment, it really made the grade... :rolleyes:

That being said not all Alternators' have regulated output... (and being that I have not done major electrical system work on "newer" Cars, I did not consider that newer ones are regulated while posting... I HUMBLY APOLOGIZE... -_-)

and If that research isn't done properly IT CAN LEAD FRIED ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS!

ON MY TAURUS FOR EXAMPLE THE ALTERNATOR VOLTAGE IS EXTERNALLY REGULATED! AND IF THAT UNIT GOES BAD OR ISN'T HOOKED UP RIGHT IT WILL FRY MY BATTERY AND ELECTRICS!

LOL

Well, now people can read what you have said.

FYI, your car has a built in regulator. It is the grey module attached to the side of your alternator. How you would hook this up incorrectly is beyond me, it plugs in one way and one way only. And to be honest, I have never had a regulator fail, typically it is the diodes in the alternator that fail. In this case, you are not in an over current situation, the alternator simply stops charging.

And FWIW, you have a 92, I have a 90, and the original poster has an 05. All utilize a regulator.

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Correct guys. I have a 270XP alternator from DC Power. Does 200amps of power at engine idle and over 270 above 1,500rpm. If i put a bigger pulley on it it would be really ******* the engine at idle.

e8237bbe.jpg

eca91d5c.jpg

Very nice. Is it a custom 3g style case, or is it a Ford case? That would fit in my Escort. lol Not that I need something that big at the moment.

"What did that set you back if you do not mind me asking?

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LOL

Well, now people can read what you have said.

FYI, your car has a built in regulator. It is the grey module attached to the side of your alternator. How you would hook this up incorrectly is beyond me, it plugs in one way and one way only. And to be honest, I have never had a regulator fail, typically it is the diodes in the alternator that fail. In this case, you are not in an over current situation, the alternator simply stops charging.

And FWIW, you have a 92, I have a 90, and the original poster has an 05. All utilize a regulator.

I am going to let this go after I get this ONE last bit in. My Alt unit isn't stock it was a home rebuild with what we had from 2 failed Taurus alternators (both had fried Voltage Regulators) and a 1987 Motorcraft Stock replacement for my moms old f-150 that was lying around for years...

Now If you want to continue this PM me, or if I have made myself clear move along

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Just to the argument part. I have seem a few Ford alternators fry with internal voltage regulators. My brothers 97 ranger just did recently actually. Luckily he had a voltage meter and noticed voltage jumping up to 15.x out of no where and replaced it but I do believe a dummy light would come on before it let voltage get dangerously high for any extended period of time. Also once the regulator completely fries I believe it just quits charging altogether. The case is fully "custom" as far as they make them and aren't rebuilt alternators. I actually had some issues with fitment since this was slightly large then the stock alternator. But I ave had great customer service from them getting it to fit properly. Even managed to get a phone call on a Saturday from them to see what was the problem so good customer service a huge plus when I buy anything from a company. And it wasn't cheap :unsure: to say the least. But they do make a 390 amp alternator for our cars so that keeps future options available to get a bigger stereo if I would feel the need. :ph34r:

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Just to the argument part. I have seem a few Ford alternators fry with internal voltage regulators. My brothers 97 ranger just did recently actually. Luckily he had a voltage meter and noticed voltage jumping up to 15.x out of no where and replaced it but I do believe a dummy light would come on before it let voltage get dangerously high for any extended period of time. Also once the regulator completely fries I believe it just quits charging altogether. The case is fully "custom" as far as they make them and aren't rebuilt alternators. I actually had some issues with fitment since this was slightly large then the stock alternator. But I ave had great customer service from them getting it to fit properly. Even managed to get a phone call on a Saturday from them to see what was the problem so good customer service a huge plus when I buy anything from a company. And it wasn't cheap :unsure: to say the least. But they do make a 390 amp alternator for our cars so that keeps future options available to get a bigger stereo if I would feel the need. :ph34r:

I am quite sure the spiking voltage is due to a bad diode. I was having a similar problem a few years back, I would be cranking the system up, and then the voltage would spike and shut the amps in my car off. After swapping the alternator out, no more issues.

That is a pretty sweet alternator, it does look like it is a bit bigger in diameter. Is that the problem with the fit?

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I am going to let this go after I get this ONE last bit in. My Alt unit isn't stock it was a home rebuild with what we had from 2 failed Taurus alternators (both had fried Voltage Regulators) and a 1987 Motorcraft Stock replacement for my moms old f-150 that was lying around for years...

Now If you want to continue this PM me, or if I have made myself clear move along

I am not sure why you did not put this information in your original post. We have no way of knowing that you have frankensteined the electrical in your car. And fwiw, you are not going to fry any batteries or burn out your electronics. You still have a regulator that is monitoring the electrical system. If the regulator fails, the alternator will stop charging. The external regulators are better in a way as they are out of the way mounted to the frame away from the engine. Heat kills.

One thing you should consider though, is the fact you actually downgraded your charging system from what the car came with from the factory. The original alternator would have been 130A. You likely installed an 85A or 100A alternator in it's place.

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I'll post pics tomorrow of the problem area. I think this is one of the very first alternators they have ever made for a Taurus to be honest. They go off of specs from the stock alternator and engine specs. It was literally 1/8" or so that caused the problem. Little play time with the grinder fixed everything.

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