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Spridget

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Spridget last won the day on April 17

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About Spridget

  • Rank
    In a shed, doing maths
  • Birthday September 3

Car Information

  • My Car
    1996 Ford Taurus SHO
  • Engine
    3.4L V8

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    The Lone Star State
  • Chapter
    Southwest
  • TCCA Name
    spridget

Recent Profile Visitors

15190 profile views
  1. Looking for the lightest, non-chrome, affordable 20” wheels, here’s what I found. Not sure how I feel about the dark wheels. Kinda feel like it’s been played out for a while, and yet it’s still popular. I did not want gloss black, these are somewhere in between matte and satin “bare titanium” (they are aluminum wheels). These are Vöxx Leggero, weighing 27lbs bare. I have not yet measured the weight difference between these and factory wheels.
  2. Nope. Couldn’t do it. Took out the H&R springs. 👎 Even with Drive Control set to Sport, the front end was to prone to bottom out. The car wasn’t “sporty”, although the lower ride height did improve cornering, it couldn’t handle small bumps.
  3. I would be remiss if I didn’t say ride quality is most definitely sacrificed, but cornering is also much improved. With Drive Control set to Sport, the suspension firms up and seems to me to be the best match for the springs. Body roll is almost eliminated. I was afraid the H&R springs would lower too much, as I’ve seen from most of their applications, and I’d say that’s true here too. I’d like half an inch back. Looks good though.
  4. H&R springs installed today. Replaced all four sway bar links, which corrected some clunks I was hearing. Car rides much quieter now. Ride quality on the lowering springs ain’t bad. The Lincoln’s “Drive Control” handling modes provide 3 settings, Comfort, Normal, and Sport. Sport was always very firm, Normal is fine. Comfort was always soft and floaty, now it’s soft and “sproingy”. Rebound / jounce aren’t matched well with the stiffer, shorter springs. About 1.25” drop in the front, 1.5” in the rear.
  5. After several tanks of 87 octane without issue, I switched to 91 and uploaded the 91 performance tune. 1000 miles on 87 I recorded 22.8mpg (includes some light towing and idling). Definitely an improvement in acceleration. Torque comes on earlier and remains flat to a higher redline. Shifts are deliberate without being overly firm. Sport mode is very quick. I never got the opportunity to gauge the performance next to another car 😒. Fuel mileage remained essentially the same, averaging 23.4mpg over roughly 1500 miles. I have returned to the 87 tune for now. I got a package from H&R. 🤫 I was sitting behind an EcoBoost F-150 at a stop light which sounded nearly identical to the MKS, only slightly more “boom” from the shotgun exhaust tips. 😄
  6. Recipe for LED puddle lamps You’ll need: • 30-31mm LED festoon bulbs • small pry tool, small knife, etc • clear silicone sealant After removing the puddle lamps from the mirrors, bake the lamps at 200°F for 10-15 minutes. Carefully remove from the oven and gently pry the clear plastic lens from the black plastic housing. Remove the lamp and replace with the LED bulb. Test the lamps for correct polarity prior to sealing the lens. Use a small amount of silicone sealant around the rim of the lens to secure it in place. Repeat for the other side.
  7. Installed the SHO Performance Package from Unleashed Tuning. I’ve worked with Torrie in the past, which is why I chose him over Livernois. Installation was fairly simple. Plug swap is surprisingly easy on the EcoBoost (compared to a Duratec or 3.4L SHO). Thermostat was also straight forward. MAP sensor swap takes 15 seconds. The reprogramming process takes a few minutes using the X4 device. I’m currently running an 87 octane tune. First impressions: throttle is remapped for better response. Shifts are about the same, maybe slightly quicker/firmer. Redline is slightly higher. Overall improvement in driving experience, but no change to fuel economy. I’ll update after I try the 93 octane tune. Oh, and too bad I didn’t have the X4 prior to hacking the hole at the intake snorkel or I could have provided before and after results, however, the X4 reports intake temps at around 5°F above ambient.
  8. Good thing it’s so far away. I’d be all over that 😅
  9. Familiarizing myself with the EcoBoost engine bay today. I noticed this air intake inlet is kinda small. The inlet is sealed from the engine bay and draws fresh air from the left grill. Where’s my dremel? I’m not making any claims about performance, but ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ why not. I wouldn’t mind some more intake noises. and I debadged the trunk.
  10. I tapped a power lead to the amp. Grey/red gets power at all times and runs to a 20A fuse. I used the 10A fuse supplied with the kit as well. Works great.
  11. Very happy with the Borla cat back kit. Very nice fit for a multi-piece system. It’s a little tight next to the rear diff, but I haven’t heard any bumps or rattles from inside. The stock exhaust has a small relief or indentation at the diff for clearance, but the entire length of the Borla kit is mandrel bent and perfectly round. I have not seen competing kits to compare, but I would be surprised if the quality is even close to Borla. Sound is very well controlled in the cabin. It’s maybe a decibel louder than stock. Very quiet overall. Noticeably “not stock” at start up. At WOT, there is definitely more bark. Sound is projected behind the car. Around 40mph, light load, there’s a very low tone, almost a “drone”. Cruising is silent. V6s rarely sound amazing, and this is no exception, however, the sound is pleasant, aggressive, clean and mellow. I installed a tow hitch today, CURT brand. Simple install, made even easier by the Borla mufflers. Fits great. I’m not done with the light adapter wiring. The kit, also from CURT, wants me to run a dedicated 10A rated power wire from the battery to the trunk. Uh, I’m thinking there’s plenty of power somewhere in the trunk. I’m only connecting a small trailer, with full LED lighting, that might pull 2 amps.
  12. Hi y’all, I replaced my 2014 Mercedes C250 with a 2016 Lincoln MKS EcoBoost last week. This was the result of being rear ended by an F250 towing a bass boat. The Lincoln MKS is a fat bloated waste of space. Terrible storage and poor ergonomics. Overall features are nice, but lack intuitive controls. Knowing all that, I needed a safe replacement to haul my kid around, anything that wasn’t Mercedes level of ownership costs, and something I can tinker with. Enter the MKSHO! 20 years separate my ‘96 SHO and ‘16 MKS, and yet they are the same damn car. JBL stereo - THX stereo. 4 wheel active suspension (SARC) - adaptive ride control. Even the driver’s trunk release buttons are in the same spot. Now they even share Borla cat back exhausts (Ford Performance).
  13. So the car has been parked for over a year with 3/4 tank of gas. Fuel pump had gone bad when I parked it. Fortunately, I had added some fuel stabilizer before I parked it, knowing it was gonna sit for a little while (a lotta while). Finally got tired of the weeds growing up around it and no time or money to drop the fuel tank. Cut a hole! So much easier. Took about an hour all total. I noticed the old pump has already been messed with before. The ring around the tank seal was mangled and the top of the pump was broken from someone prying on it. New pump in, fired right up.
  14. The 3.4L block uses the same diameter pistons (and rods) from the 2.5L Duratec. IIRC the SHO pistons are flat top whereas the Duratec pistons are dished. Since the rods are shared with the Duratec 2.5 and 3.0, I always thought it would be cool to bore and sleeve the 3.4L and use Duratec 3.0 pistons for a 4.0L SHO.
  15. I think these cars are just prone to inner tire wear. Any part of the suspension or steering is worn, you’re gonna get inner tire wear. Even worn subframe bushings. 2-3 years is a reasonable expectation between alignments before components wear out and advance tire wear. You can drill the spot welds and cut the little tabs to allow an extra few tenths of a degree of camber adjustment.
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